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Category: diversity
  • A Mighty Girl's favorite back-to-school books for young children!

    It can be easy for adults to forget that, for kids, school is an adventure: sometimes exhilarating, sometimes nerve-wracking, and always full of new experiences! Each year at school, kids face new challenges like building relationships with peers, meeting new expectations from teachers, and discovering their own talents and gifts. And, like any time you start an adventure, it helps to be prepared — with a few good books to reassure Mighty Girls that they're ready to take on whatever comes their way!

    Whether your Mighty Girl is starting school for the first time, moving to a new school, or just anticipating the start of a new year, these books will help her feel prepared. By answering some of her questions about what it will be like — and reassuring her that there are wonderful things to learn and do there — you can help your Mighty Girl get excited about her first day. Continue reading Continue reading

  • A Mighty Girl's top picks of books for children and teens celebrating acceptance and the value of diversity.

    For parents and educators concerned about fostering children's appreciation of diversity and acceptance of others, it can sometimes feel like an uphill battle in such divisive times. From the subtle to the overt, discrimination based on sex, race, sexual orientation, religion, country of origin, appearance, and ability does exist, and tackling it can be a difficult conversation to have with kids regardless of their age.

    Fortunately, thoughtful stories exploring these issues in sensitive and compassionate ways can help make such discussions a bit easier. To that end, in this blog post, we've collected our top picks of books for both children and teens that explore the ways in which our differences shape our views of the world, affect how we interact with one another, and influence our future — and how those differences are strengths to be celebrated. As well, many of these titles show kids how to stand up for their peers and others when they see discrimination happening right in front of them. By sharing books like these, kids will learn the most important lesson of living in a diverse world: by standing together, there's nothing we can't accomplish.

    For over 200 titles that celebrate acceptance of differences, visit our Tolerance & Acceptance Collection. For more books that star Mighty Girls of all cultures, races, religions, sexual orientations, and abilities, visit our Multicultural Fiction Collection. Continue reading Continue reading

  • British suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst being arrested by police outside Buckingham Palace in 1914 British suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst being arrested by police outside Buckingham Palace in 1914

    By Jennifer de Beer, A Mighty Girl Senior Research Intern

    Do you know the name of the Polish social worker who rescued 2,500 Jewish children from the Warsaw Ghetto during WWII? How about the name of America’s first female self-made millionaire? Can you name a British suffrage movement leader who Time Magazine declared to be one of the most important people of the 20th century? Or the name of a real-life woman pirate?

    While we always delight in hearing about the achievements of women in history, there are some names that get much more attention than others. Children and adults of today are likely to be very familiar with the experiences of Rosa Parks, Amelia Earhart, and Helen Keller -- and rightly so. However, there are many other talented, courageous, and remarkable women who also deserve to have their stories told, but whose names are far less familiar.

    We have gathered together a list of ten of these women, whom you may not recognize, but whose journeys are more than worthy of your attention. Sometimes these women have been relegated to the footnotes of history books, their experiences almost entirely glossed over. Yet, each woman made significant contributions or noteworthy strides in her lifetime.

    In addition to the descriptions listed below, you will find their stories within our collection of over 400 biographies of remarkable girls and women. We also share many stories of Mighty Girl heroes of yesteryear and today on our Facebook page.

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  • Lola at the Library Lola at the Library

    By Lili Sandler, A Mighty Girl Senior Research Intern

    As a final tribute in our celebration of Black History Month this year, we’re sharing ten of our favorite picture books featuring little Mighty Girls girls of color for the youngest readers. This is only a sampling of what’s available on the site; there are so many fabulous picture books for babies, preschoolers, and beyond with diverse protagonists that we couldn’t possibly highlight them all in one blog post!

    It’s never too early to share a love of reading with little ones, and going to the library is one of the best ways to accomplish that goal! With Anna McQuinn’s book, Lola at the Library, your little one will learn to look forward to visiting the library just like Lola does. With bright, vibrant illustrations courtesy of Rosalind Beardshaw, this book is not only a delight to read, but a delight to look at as well.

    Another book sure to be a hit with babies and toddlers is Rachel Isadora’s Peekaboo Morning. Every toddler loves to play peekaboo, and they’ll have such fun following the active and adorable protagonist of this story going through her morning, playing peekaboo with her mommy, her daddy, her puppy, and more! This is one of those books your child will want to read again and again. Continue reading Continue reading

  • marian2By Lili Sandler, A Mighty Girl Senior Research Intern

    On this day in Mighty Girl history, acclaimed singer and civil rights pioneer Marian Anderson was born in Philadelphia in 1897. Her musical talent was evident from a young age, and her parents did everything they could to encourage her musical pursuits. Anderson was only 6 when she began performing with the Union Baptist Church, where she was often referred to as “baby contralto”.

    Her family was unable to afford piano lessons, so little Marian taught herself to play starting at the age of 8. Dedicated to her church choir, she would rehearse all of the parts to the every song, performing them for her family until they were just right. Her community was so impressed with her commitment that they raised enough money to pay for private lessons with a well-known vocal instructor. Continue reading Continue reading

  • rosy cheeksBy Lili Sandler, A Mighty Girl Senior Research Intern, and Katherine Handcock, A Mighty Girl Communications Specialist

    Nearly every child, girl and boy alike, loves to play with dolls in one of the many forms a doll can take. One child might prefer an action figure, or paper dolls, while another may choose a baby doll to care for and cuddle. Some children prefer a whole family of dolls to act out scenarios in a doll’s house, while others might like a doll designed to portray a favorite character, fictitious or historical. Regardless of what kind of doll a child likes best, one thing is certain: every child should have the opportunity to play with a doll that looks just like her.

    And so, in this A Mighty Girl Spotlight post we’re highlighting dolls representing girls of African descent as part of our celebration of Black History Month. That said, there’s bound to be a doll in this list or in our main doll collection that would appeal to any Mighty Girl, from birth to adulthood, regardless of ethnicity! Continue reading Continue reading

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