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Category: Mighty Girls & Women
  • Alice Paul Tapper's new picture book encourages girls to "Be bold, Be brave, and Raise Your Hand!"

    Alice Paul Tapper was on a fourth grade school field trip when she noticed that most of the girls quietly stayed at the back of the group, while the boys clustered at the front and raised their hands to answer questions. After she realized how often she and many other girls didn't speak up in class for fears of getting an answer wrong and being embarrassed, Alice decided to launch a campaign to encourage girls to have confidence, take risks, and be leaders — and support other girls in doing the same. With the help of her Girl Scout troop, she created a new Raise Your Hand pledge and patch program, and soon girls around the country were taking a pledge to raise their hands in class. Now, the 11-year-old Mighty Girl is bringing her message directly to girls with Raise Your Hand, a new picture book telling her story and encouraging girls to "be bold, be brave, and raise your hand!" Continue reading Continue reading

  • "I find that I am bored with anything I understand," says Abel Prize winner Dr. Karen Uhlenbeck.

    American mathematician Karen Uhlenbeck has become the first woman to win the Abel Prize — the "Nobel Prize" of mathematics! The 76-year-old professor emeritus of the University of Texas at Austin and visiting scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton has made wide-ranging advances in mathematics that influence many sciences, including quantum physics and string theory, and pioneered a new field of mathematics called geometric analysis. "She did things nobody thought about doing, and after she did, she laid the foundations of a branch of mathematics," says Sun-Yung Alice Chang, a Princeton mathematician who sat on the prize committee. Hans Munthe-Kaas, chair of the Abel Committee, added that "her perspective has pervaded the field and led to some of the most dramatic advances in mathematics over the last 40 years." Continue reading Continue reading

  • 1.4 million students around the world turned out for her Global Climate Strike this week!

    Greta Thunberg, the Swedish teen activist who founded the Youth Strike for Climate Movement, has been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize for her work galvanizing youth around the world to take action on climate change! The 16-year-old began her skolstrejk för klimatet (school strike for climate) last August as a solo protest, but today her Fridays for Future protests span the globe. This week, an estimated 1.4 million students turned out for the Global Climate Strike, a day of action that saw over 2,000 events take place in 125 countries. Greta has persisted in her work to demand action from governments to address this environmental crisis, despite frequent criticism, much of it based on her age. "I agree with [my detractors], I’m too young to do this," she recently wrote. "We children shouldn’t have to do this. But since almost no one is doing anything, and our very future is at risk, we feel like we have to continue." Continue reading Continue reading

  • The rover will launch next year to search for evidence of past or present life on Mars.

    In 2020, a new rover will fly to Mars to search for signs of past or present life — so it's fitting that the rover will be named after Rosalind Franklin, the British chemist who helped uncover the mysteries of DNA! Astronaut Tim Peake announced the name at the Airbus factory in the UK where the European Space Agency (ESA) rover is being assembled. Franklin's sister, Jenifer Glynn, spoke to the BBC about the honor: "In the last year of Rosalind's life, I remember visiting her in hospital on the day when she was excited by the news of the [Soviet Sputnik satellite] — the very beginning of space exploration. She could never have imagined that over 60 years later there would be a rover sent to Mars bearing her name, but somehow that makes this project even more special." Continue reading Continue reading

  • A Mighty Girl's celebrates Ruth Bader Ginsburg on her 86th birthday!

    Supreme Court Justice, lawyer, women's rights advocate, and pop culture icon: Ruth Bader Ginsburg means so much to so many people! Whether you first encountered her name in discussions of women's rights court decisions or on websites proclaiming her Notorious RBG, there's no doubting her influence on today's world. In honor of this influential — and inspirational — lawyer, activist and Supreme Court Justice, we're sharing her powerful story, as well as our favorite books and films about this trailblazer for both children and adults. We've also highlighted a few fun resources, from t-shirts to music albums, showing how she's become such an important pop culture figure. So whether you've been a long-time fan, or you're just learning about her incredible story, we're confident you'll find something here to deepen your appreciation of the indomitable Ruth Bader Ginsburg! Continue reading Continue reading

  • A Mighty Girl's top picks of picture books about trailblazing girls and women throughout history.

    If you flip through a typical history book, you might think, as historian Gerda Lerner once wrote, that "ostensibly one-half the human race is doing everything significant and the other half doesn’t exist." Far too often, women's contributions have been neglected in history books and school curriculums — fortunately, there are growing numbers of wonderful books being published for young readers about girls and women who made their mark on history. And, there's no better time to share these stories and make sure that the next generation — girls and boys alike — appreciates the important and diverse roles that women have played in history!

    In this blog post, we've collected the best picture book on remarkable girls and women throughout history, ranging from new releases to long-time favorites. These books feature girls and women who excelled in science, politics, the arts, athletics, and other fields. And, they serve as an excellent reminder that girls and women's stories deserve to be told — all year round. Continue reading Continue reading

  • The Katherine Johnson Independent Verification and Validation Facility is located in the West Virginia native's home state.

    "Hidden Figures" mathematician Katherine Johnson played a critical role in NASA's early space program — now, the space agency is honoring her contributions by renaming a NASA software facility after her! The Katherine Johnson Independent Verification and Validation Facility , located in Johnson's home state of West Virginia, is the home of NASA's IV&V Program, which is dedicated to "contributing to the safety and success of NASA’s highest-profile missions" by improving the software used for a variety of space launches and flights. "I am thrilled we are honoring Katherine Johnson in this way as she is a true American icon who overcame incredible obstacles and inspired so many," NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in an announcement. "It’s a fitting tribute to name the facility that carries on her legacy of mission-critical computations in her honor." Continue reading Continue reading

  • Eight downloadable posters celebrating women of STEM perfect for displaying in kids' rooms and classrooms!

    The saying, "If she can't see it, she can't be it," speaks to the importance of introducing girls to female role models, especially in areas where women's accomplishments were often overlooked or minimized such as in science, mathematics, and technology. A new poster collection aims to bring more of these women's stories to light — and inspire today's Mighty Girls with the knowledge that she can be whatever she aspires to be! Continue reading Continue reading

  • This trailblazing mathematician built the geodetic model of the Earth that became the foundation for GPS.

    If you rely on your GPS for directions, you can thank a mathematician whose little-known contributions to the mathematical modeling of the Earth recently earned her one of the U.S. Air Force's highest honors: induction into the Space and Missile Pioneers Hall of Fame! Dr. Gladys West, like the "human computers" at NASA who became famous with the book Hidden Figures, began her career by performing the complex hand calculations required before the computer age. However, her greatest accomplishment was the creation of an extremely detailed geodetic model of the Earth which became the foundation for the Global Positioning System. Although GPS is ubiquitous today, West says that in the moment, she wasn't thinking about the future: "When you’re working every day, you’re not thinking, ‘What impact is this going to have on the world?’" she says. "You’re thinking, ‘I’ve got to get this right.'" Continue reading Continue reading

  • A Mighty Girl's top picks of books about women in politics from the First Ladies to trailblazing female political leaders.

    Each year on the third Monday in February, the United States celebrates its many presidents and their legacies. At A Mighty Girl, we have a slightly different take on the holiday: we like to celebrate the role of women in politics! From the First Ladies — including Martha Washington, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Michelle Obama — and the role that they have played in molding and supporting the office of the president, to the groundbreaking women who first stood in American elections, to the politicians who are shaping our world today, the story of women in American politics is constantly evolving.

    Along with recognizing these pioneering women, we also forward to the day when we can switch our President’s Day focus to celebrating the future women elected as Commander in Chief, and no doubt there are many more trailblazers to come! Continue reading Continue reading

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